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The Importance of Contrast Sensitivity In Baseball

The Importance of Contrast Sensitivity in Baseball 640×350Baseball players train hard to develop muscular strength and endurance, but did you know that sharp vision and strong visual skills can be just as crucial to your game?

Winning at baseball requires split-second calculations. When a ball spins toward you at lightning speed, figuring out what kind of pitch is approaching can be the difference between a strike and a home run.

The longer it takes you to identify the pitch, the harder it is to hit it, no matter how well-developed your swinging technique is.

To identify the pitch, baseball players need excellent contrast sensitivity. This is the visual skill that enables you to quickly see the ball’s red seams as the white ball approaches — and decide if it’s a knuckleball, fastball or slider.

What Is Contrast Sensitivity and How Can It Make You a Winner?

Contrast sensitivity is the ability to distinguish between an object and its background. It’s a crucial visual skill, because no matter how strong you swing, or how fast you run, your ability to hit that home run is impacted if you can’t distinguish the ball from a cloudy sky, or the red seams from the white part of a moving baseball.

How Baseball Vision Training Can Be a Game Changer

One way you can go from being a good ball player to an outstanding one is to improve your contrast sensitivity. This means adding sports vision training to your regimen.

At Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands we’ll custom-design a program to develop your contrast sensitivity. We’ll begin with a functional eye exam to assess your contrast sensitivity and the other visual skills needed to successfully play baseball.

Sports vision training involves eye exercises that teach the eyes and brain to work together more quickly and efficiently. You’ll meet with us for in-clinic sessions and continue training exercises at home.

See the ball more accurately and be ready to hit it out of the park! Talk to us at Child & Family Eye Care and find out how sports vision training can make all the difference in your game.

Our practice serves patients from The Woodlands, Magnolia, Shenandoah, and Tomball, Texas and surrounding communities.

 

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Troy Wagner

Q: How is contrast sensitivity measured?

A: One way to determine contrast sensitivity is through a Pelli-Robson test, which is like a regular eye chart but one that features rows of dark letters that gradually get lighter. Wave grating is another type of contrast sensitivity test and requires you to identify shapes at different spatial frequencies and levels of contrast.

Q: What other visual skills are important for baseball?

A: In addition to contrast sensitivity, the following visual skills can improve your baseball game:

  • Focusing – keeping your eye on the ball
  • Eye teaming – the eyes’ ability to work together to keep track of movements on the field
  • Peripheral vision –detecting activity, such as a player stealing a base, on the edges of your visual field
  • Visual processing – detecting and interpreting visual information so you can hit or catch the ball

 

Are Children with IEPs More Likely to Have Vision Problems?

Children with IEPs 640×350Children with IEPs — school-based Individualized Educational Programs — are more likely to experience problems with their eyes, especially their visual skills. Visual skills include the eye’s ability to focus and track and work as a team, but these and many other visual difficulties aren’t detected in traditional vision screenings.

Children with IEPs may pass the standard 20/20 sight test administered in schools. However, the results of these basic screenings aren’t a reliable indication of a child’s ability to perform activities involving close vision, such as reading, writing or solving puzzles.

Even a child with 20/20 vision may have visual deficits that need to be treated, such as lazy eyes or difficulties with visual processing.

While basic school vision screenings assess eyesight, only a comprehensive developmental eye exam can assess visual system deficits or dysfunction that can impede performance in school and while playing sports.

Why is a Comprehensive Eye Exam Crucial for Children with IEPs?

Many children diagnosed with a learning disability may actually have an undiagnosed visual deficit that is causing their reading and learning difficulties—or at least contributing to them.

A 2018 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 80% of children with reading difficulties had vision problems, compared to children who read at grade level.

In a 2012 Ohio State study, 69% of children with IEPs passed traditional eyesight tests. The reason: basic eyesight tests evaluate a child’s ability to see distant letters and objects, but don’t assess how well they see near objects or letters at reading distance, such as in a workbook.

The researchers recommended that children with IEPs undergo a comprehensive eye exam, which includes an assessment of their visual skills.

What Does a Comprehensive Eye Exam Assess?

A comprehensive eye exam evaluates three main types of visual skills:

  • Binocular vision – the eyes’ ability to work together as a team
  • Oculomotor – the eyes’ ability to track objects and move effectively
  • Accommodation – the eyes’ ability to change focus from near to far

A comprehensive eye exam can detect the following conditions and more:

  • Convergence insufficiency – the eyes’ inability to work together to focus on nearby objects
  • Strabismus/eye turn – each eye points in a different direction due to eye misalignment
  • Amblyopia/lazy eye – one eye is considerably weaker than the other
  • Accommodative dysfunction – an eye-focusing problem

What Does a Comprehensive Eye Exam Involve?

A comprehensive eye exam is designed to measure more than visual acuity and can evaluate overall eye health, diagnose eye conditions and test how your eyes work together. It may include the following:

  • Visual acuity – tests the clarity of sight
  • Cover test – evaluates individual eye functioning
  • Slit lamp – examines the front of the eye
  • Pupil dilation – looks at eye health
  • Retinoscopy – measures refractive errors
  • Refraction – assesses for nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism
  • Visual skills – tests how well the eyes function together

How Vision Therapy Can Help IEP Children with Vision Problems

Vision therapy is a customized program of eye exercises that improves visual skills, strengthens eye muscles as well as the way the eyes and brain communicate and work together. The activities can be integrated into an IEP program to suit a child’s individualized learning program and visual needs.

Vision therapy helps kids improve their vision because it trains their eyes to:

  • Track – fixate on objects visually
  • Team – ensuring the eyes work together
  • Focus – see objects comfortably and clearly all the time

If your child has an IEP, schedule a comprehensive vision exam by contacting Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands today.

Our practice serves patients from The Woodlands, Magnolia, Shenandoah, and Tomball, Texas and surrounding communities.

 

Q&A

How can vision problems affect a student’s educational performance?

If your child struggles to read or keep up with their classmates, they may have an undetected visual problem. Reading fluency and comprehension are dependent on the strength of visual skills— especially focusing, binocular vision, convergence, saccades, and visual fixation. A customized program of vision therapy can help strengthen these lagging skills and improve their academic perfromance.

How do vision problems affect behavior?

Behavioral problems that can arise due to vision problems include hyperactivity, inattentiveness, lack of motivation, refusal or hesitation to do homework, poor reading comprehension, skips lines or words when reading, and frequent eye rubbing and head tilting.

If a child displays any of the above symptoms, call ​​Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands to schedule a functional visual evaluation.

 

 

 

 

Should I Go To the ER For an Eye Emergency?

Dry Eye Asian Man 640×350

Eye emergencies can be alarming, especially if you aren’t sure where to go or what to do when they occur.

At Child & Family Eye Care, we’re here to take the guesswork out of navigating eye emergencies.

What’s Considered an Eye Emergency?

A wide range of conditions fall under the category of an eye emergency, but what they all have in common is that they pose a risk to your vision and eye health.

Common types of eye emergencies include:

  • Eye Infection
  • Foreign object stuck in eye
  • Eye trauma/injury
  • Scratched cornea (surface of the eye)
  • Sudden onset and increase in visual floaters or flashes
  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Moderate to severe eye pain
  • Eyes that don’t move in sync
  • Different sized pupils
  • Bleeding or discharge coming from the eye
  • One bulging eye
  • Burning, stinging or itchy eyes
  • Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
  • Chemical or heat burns

What To Do In Case of an Eye Emergency

Try to stay calm and contact Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands without delay.
Although your first instinct may be to rush to an emergency room or urgent care center, a trip to your eye doctor can be more efficient.

That’s because urgent care facilities are often overcrowded, understaffed, or simply aren’t as experienced in the field of eye emergencies. You may be more comfortable in an eye doctor’s office, where you won’t have to wait as long to be treated.

Here’s some science to backup that point.

A 2018 study published in Ophthalmology found that 25% of eye-related conditions treated in the emergency department were diagnosed with non-urgent conditions that could have been easily treated in an optometrist’s office.

That study also noted that people who have an established relationship with a local optometrist were 10% less likely to visit the emergency room for eye-related matters.

Of course, you’ll want to use your best judgment and seek emergency medical care in cases of severe eye injuries or infections, especially those that may require surgery or hospitalization. If you aren’t sure, call Child & Family Eye Care and we’ll help guide you.

We Can Treat Your Eye Emergencies

At Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands, we offer a wide range of eye care services, including emergency eye care.

Our facility is equipped to handle all sorts of eye emergencies for your convenience and comfort.

Contact us today to learn more about our services, and ask about our emergency eye care hours.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can bleach in the eye cause blindness?

  • A:Chlorine is a main ingredient in many household cleaners and bleaches, and can seriously damage your eye tissue if it gets in your eye. In severe cases, chlorine or bleach in the eye can cause blindness. If you get bleach or other household chemicals in your eye, immediately remove your contact lenses if you’re wearing some, and begin to irrigate your eyes with clean tap water. Then, contact your eye doctor for further instructions.

Q: What should you not do in an eye emergency?

  • A: Resist the urge to rub, press or touch your eyes, as this can cause more damage. If something is lodged or embedded in your eye, or it feels like something is stuck in your eye, don’t use an object (like a cotton swab or tweezers) to try and remove it. Only an eye care professional should remove a foreign body from your eye.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Child & Family Eye Care for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus

Everything You Need To Know About Keratoconus 640×350If you’ve been diagnosed with keratoconus, our The Woodlands eye doctors understand your challenge and are here to help you see clearly and comfortably.

Below are some of the most commonly asked questions to help you gain a better understanding of what keratoconus is and how it can be treated.

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus affects about 1 in every 2,000 people. This progressive eye disease impacts the shape of the cornea, weakening it and causing it to thin and bulge outward into a cone shape.

The cornea is the clear, dome-shaped outer covering of the eye. It’s responsible for focusing incoming light onto the retina at the back of the eye to enable clear vision. So, when keratoconus develops, the change in the cornea’s shape directly impacts the way light is focused.

Keratoconus often results in nearsightedness and high levels of astigmatism — two refractive errors that cause blurry and distorted vision.

If left untreated, keratoconus can lead to permanent corneal damage and even loss of vision.

What Typically Causes Keratoconus?

Keratoconus develops when the collagen fibers that support the cornea begin to weaken. While having a family member with the disease is a significant risk factor, the following conditions can also lead to keratoconus:

  • Eye trauma
  • Eye allergies
  • Excessive eye rubbing
  • Certain eye diseases
  • Marfan syndrome
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • Down syndrome
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta
  • Addison’s disease
  • Leber’s congenital amaurosis

The Signs & Symptoms of Keratoconus

The symptoms of keratoconus include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Distorted vision, with straight lines appearing bent or wavy
  • Sensitivity to bright light and glare
  • Red and irritated eyes
  • Increasing difficulty wearing standard contact lenses

Keratoconus tends to be initially detected in teens or young adults in their 20s, but symptoms can develop at any age.

Keratoconus symptoms usually start out mild but grow progressively worse over time — often over a decade or two — until the condition plateaus.

Both eyes are usually affected, and it’s common to have a difference in optical prescriptions between each eye.

Can Keratoconus Cause Vision Loss?

Keratoconus progression causes nearsightedness, astigmatism and visual distortions to worsen.

Eventually, corneal swelling can lead to scarring of the corneal tissue, which diminishes its transparency and increases your risk of vision loss.

Early detection and treatment of this condition are therefore critical for preventing permanent vision loss.

Can Keratoconus Be Corrected?

Initially, blurry and distorted vision can be corrected with custom-fit soft contact lenses or eyeglasses. However, as the condition progresses and your cornea becomes increasingly cone-shaped, these standard methods of vision correction become less effective.

At this point, many patients with mild to moderate keratoconus opt for scleral lenses, an effective, non-surgical method of achieving clear vision.

Severe keratoconus may require a corneal transplant procedure to replace your damaged cornea with a healthy donor cornea.

Scleral Lenses for Keratoconus

Custom designed scleral lenses help patients with corneal irregularities achieve dramatic improvements in visual acuity and comfort. Scleral lenses vault over the cornea and rest on the sclera while avoiding the diseased cornea. This creates a new optical surface instead of the damaged cornea and prevents discomfort by resting on the sclera of the eye. Moreover, the reservoir of pure saline solution between the back surface of the lens and the front of the cornea ensures that the eye is always in a liquid environment – making it optimal for healing.

Don’t let keratoconus impact your quality of life. We can help you achieve clear, comfortable vision with scleral contact lenses.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with keratoconus, call today to schedule a scleral lens consultation.

Our practice serves patients from The Woodlands, Magnolia, Shenandoah, and Tomball, Texas and surrounding communities.

 

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Troy Wagner

Q: What Are the Advantages of Wearing Scleral Lenses?

A: Below are the main benefits of wearing scleral lenses:

  • Scleral lenses are made of high-quality materials, which means they’ll last for the long haul.
  • Their large [size] enables them to stay centered and stable on your eye.
  • The vaulted lens holds hydrating saline solution which creates optimal conditions for ultimate comfort and healing of dry eyes.
  • Because the scleral lenses cover more surface of the eye than traditional lenses, they also help shield the eyes from external irritants.

Q: Are scleral lenses covered by insurance?

A: When it comes to scleral lenses, every insurance company is different. We recommend contacting us or checking with your insurance provider to find out if scleral lenses are covered under your plan.

Can Cataract Surgery Prevent Dementia?

Cataract surgery is a highly successful procedure that removes cataracts, the cloudy formations on the eye’s lens that impair vision.

Now, researchers are discovering that vision loss may be linked to a higher rate of dementia and suggest that restoring clear vision (through cataract surgery, for example) may reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Is There a Correlation Between Cataracts and Dementia?

More than half of those 80 or older have had at least one cataract. Many people in this age range also have dementia, a decline in cognitive functioning.

But is there a connection between these two seemingly unrelated conditions?

Recent studies suggest that, yes, there could be a link. One 15-year study found that patients with age-related vision problems, including cataracts, had a higher incidence of dementia.

The 2021 study, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, followed 12,000 subjects aged 55-73. When compared to patients with healthy vision, cataract patients had an 11% higher incidence of dementia.

Can Cataract Surgery Prevent Dementia?

Can sight-saving cataract surgery reduce your risk of dementia? It certainly looks promising!

A 2022 study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that removing cataracts was “significantly associated with a lower risk of dementia development.” In fact, patients who had undergone cataract surgery had a 29% lower rate of dementia.

In addition, MRI scans have shown greater brain activity following cataract surgery.

How Can Vision Loss Cause Dementia?

Scientists studying the link between vision loss and dementia suspect that vision loss negatively impacts the brain. They theorize that the more visual information we receive, the more active our brains are, and brain activity may be able to fend off dementia.

For this reason, by restoring clear vision, cataract surgery may stimulate the brain and prevent cognitive decline.

There could be an emotional and social dimension to cognitive decline as well. People who suffer from significant vision loss often feel isolated. They may feel discouraged by their inability to recognize faces or perform everyday tasks, and may avoid social interactions. According to the Centers for Disease Control, social isolation raises the risk of developing dementia by 50%.

If you have cataracts and you feel your quality of life is affected, schedule an appointment with Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands without delay. We’ll answer your questions about cataract surgery and ensure you receive optimal treatment.

Q&A With Our Optometrist

How is cataract surgery performed?

Cataract surgery is a short 30-40 minute procedure that replaces your cloudy, natural lens with a synthetic intraocular lens (IOL). First, the eye surgeon makes a hole in the cloudy lens and breaks it into tiny pieces. Next, the eye surgeon places the new clear lens onto the eye. You’ll be conscious throughout the surgery. The surgery is safe, effective and painless.

Is cataract surgery always successful?

Cataract surgery is highly successful, with a 99% success rate. Complications from cataract surgery are very rare.

Laser Treatment for Glaucoma

Lasers aren’t just for science fiction movies anymore! Did you know that they’re commonly used for vision correction surgery, and to treat eye diseases such as glaucoma?

And these kinds of surgeries won’t necessarily keep you bound to the hospital, either They’re often performed as outpatient procedures, meaning you can go home right after.

Besides LASIK and similar laser vision correction surgeries, one of the most frequent reasons people get laser surgery is a condition called open angle glaucoma.

What is open angle glaucoma?

The eye disease known as glaucoma occurs when high inner eye pressure causes damage to the opitic nerve at the back of the eye. There are two major types of glaucoma – angle-closure glaucoma and open angle glaucoma.

In open angle glaucoma, the space between the iris and cornea is normal but inner eye pressure still rises, causing slow damage over time, usually by an elevation in eye pressure. If untreated, the resulting damage to the optic nerve can result in vision loss over time. There are many subtypes of open angle glaucoma, with the most common ones being primary open angle glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma, inflammatory glaucoma and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma.

Lasers and eye drop therapy

Sometimes, in order to avoid surgery, eye doctors will prescribe special eye drops that may help reduce the pressure inside the eye. However, when these eye drops fail, a laser procedure known as selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) can be performed. This procedure makes small burns in a part of the eye called the trabecular meshwork, increasing outflow of fluids from the eye, and lowering inner eye pressure. Most types of open angle glaucoma can be treated with SLT, and the procedure can generally be repeated every year if necessary.

Want to know more about open angle glaucoma and how lasers can be used to treat it? Speak to our The Woodlands eye doctors at Child & Family Eye Care today!

Q&A

Which type of glaucoma is worse?

Angle-closure glaucoma makes up only roughly 10% of all cases of glaucoma, but is generally considered to be the much more severe form of the disease. Characterized by acute and sudden pain in the eye, nausea and vomiting, this form of glaucoma can quickly cause loss of vision and total blindness.

Can glaucoma surgery improve vision?

Timely glaucoma surgery can prevent significant vision loss and save you from total blindness. However, damage already caused by glaucoma, and any related loss of vision is permanent and cannot be reversed by any medication or procedure. The best way to preserve your eyesight with glaucoma is timely detection and treatment.

Most Eye Injuries Can Be Prevented With Protective Eyewear

opticare store near me

What if we told you that 9 out of 10 people treated for eye accidents could have prevented their injury?

Safety experts say that nearly all eye injuries can be prevented by wearing protective eyewear: safety glasses and goggles that come in both prescription and non-prescription versions.

At Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands, we help patients keep their eyes healthy and safe, and can guide you towards the safety eyewear most suitable for you.

Who Needs Safety Glasses?

Anyone who finds themselves in a potentially hazardous environment should wear properly-fitting safety glasses to keep their eyes safe and healthy.

Common eye hazards include projectiles, chemicals, radiation, debris, sparks, and particles of metal, wood or other materials. Fast-moving balls and hockey pucks are also potential hazards.

From DIY-ers and construction workers to hobbyists, lab technicians and athletes, there’s a wide range of people who can benefit from protective eyewear. Here’s a short list of activities that require safety glasses, whether you do them professionally or for fun:

  • Woodworking
  • Metalworking
  • Glassworking
  • Gardening
  • Fishing
  • Hunting
  • Martial arts
  • Motorcycling
  • Archery
  • Fencing
  • Bicycling

What Type of Safety Glasses Do I Need?

There are several types of safety glasses and each is made for a specific purpose or activity. Wearing the incorrect type of eyewear for your activity can be just as risky as forgoing them altogether.

Some popular choices of safety glasses include:

  • Anti-fog safety glasses
  • Polarized safety glasses
  • Over-your-glasses safety glasses
  • Bifocal safety glasses
  • Laser safety glasses
  • Medical safety glasses
  • Welding goggles
  • Splash goggles
  • Color blind safety glasses

Safety glasses come in many sizes for children and adults, ensuring the most secure and comfortable fit.

Not sure which type of safety glasses you need? No problem — we can help.

Be Safe, Not Sorry

At Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands, we know how precious your vision is, and we’re here to help you preserve it.

Whether it’s a routine eye exam or helping you select the right protective eyewear — your eyes and vision are our top priority.

To learn more about our eye care services or to schedule an appointment, call Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I need safety glasses for sports?

  • A:Yes, in many cases. Sports that require protective eyewear include but aren’t limited to shooting/hunting, lacrosse and soccer. Safety glasses are highly recommended for sports like football, baseball, basketball, tennis and racquetball. To learn if your sport or activity requires safety glasses, contact ​​Child & Family Eye Care today.

Q: Do I need a second pair of safety glasses?

  • A: Whether it’s safety glasses or regular prescription glasses, having a backup pair is always a good idea in case one pair gets lost or damaged. You also may want to have another pair to switch up your look, or to protect your eyes from different activities. Your gardening safety eyewear wouldn’t be the same as your cycling glasses.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Child & Family Eye Care for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Can We Stop Myopia From Progressing?

boy and a girl with myopiaIf you think more powerful prescription glasses are the right solution to keep your child’s myopia from getting worse, think again. Talk to us about myopia management, which can slow the progression of myopia (nearsightedness) by up to 78%.

How Does Myopia Worsen?

In nearsighted people, the cornea, the clear outer layer of the eye, is more curved than in non-myopes. This elongated eyeball shape refracts incoming light in front of the retina rather than directly on it. The result? Blurred vision.

In other words, the longer the eyeball, the more severe the myopia.

The following can contribute to myopia progression:

  • Eye growth – as children grow, so do the eyeballs. And in certain cases, they become elongated (myopia).
  • Hereditary factors – if one or both parents have myopia, the condition is likely to progress at a rapid pace.
  • Not enough outdoor time –1 to 2 hours a day outdoors is recommended to prevent myopia progression.
  • Excessive screen time – myopia development and progression have been linked to extended screen time.

What Is Myopia Management?

Myopia management is a custom-designed treatment plan that identifies slows or stops myopia progression. Our optometrists provide diagnostic eye exams and create a myopia management program to keep your child’s nearsightedness in check.

Why Is Myopia Management Important?

Myopia doesn’t just affect your child’s ability to see distant objects; it can increase your child’s risk of developing these serious eye problems in adulthood:

  • Glaucoma
  • Cataracts
  • Myopia macular degeneration
  • Retinal detachment

The sooner your child begins myopia management, the better the chances of slowing myopia’s progression and reducing the risk of eye diseases later in life.

Myopia Management Can Preserve Your Child’s Vision

If you’re eager to preserve your child’s eyesight now and in the future, myopia management can help. Book an appointment at Child & Family Eye Care today!

Our practice serves patients from The Woodlands, Magnolia, Shenandoah, and Tomball, Texas and surrounding communities.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Troy Wagner

Q: Does screen time affect myopia?

  • A: Yes. In a study published in The Lancet Digital Health (October 2021), an international team of researchers found that at least 3 hours of screen time per day can increase the risk of developing myopia by 30%. Other research suggests that reducing your child’s screen time and encouraging more outdoor activities can prevent myopia and keep it from progressing.

Q: When should one start myopia management?

A: As soon as possible! Research shows that the earlier a child becomes myopic, the faster their myopia will progress. Act quickly if you want to have the greatest impact on slowing myopia progression.

 

June 27 Is National Sunglasses Day!

Monday, Jun 27, 2022 is National Sunglasses Day, so grab your favorite pair of sunnies and celebrate!

Many people think sunglasses are little more than a fashion accessory or a way to minimize glare while driving.

But the truth is that wearing sunglasses is vital if you want to safeguard your eye health and vision.

Why Sunglasses are Important

The number one reason to wear sunglasses is that they prevent ultraviolet (UV) light from entering your eyes.

UV light has been shown to age every part of the eye, from the delicate outer eye tissue to the tiny structures within the eye itself. Chronic UV exposure raises your risk of developing cataracts, age-related macular degeneration and corneal damage.

The skin on your eyelids is the thinnest skin of your body, and UV light exposure can further thin eyelid skin, leading to premature aging and the appearance of dark circles and under-eye bags. Additionally, wearing sunglasses can help prevent wrinkles because you’ll squint less in the sunshine. Who knew sunglasses can be a key player in your anti-aging routine?

Moreover, UV light has been shown to slow the cornea’s ability to heal itself, making sunglasses a medical necessity for people who’ve recently had eye surgery like LASIK, or those who frequently wear contacts (overwearing contacts can irritate the cornea).

Finally, sunglasses are a fun way to show the world your personality and accessorize any outfit.

Activities for National Sunglasses Day

Not sure how to celebrate National Sunglasses Day? Here are a few ideas you may enjoy.

Sport your favorite pair of sunglasses during an outdoor activity, whether it’s a barbecue with friends, a concert at a stadium or time spent in the park.

You can also celebrate National Sunglasses Day by gifting a pair of quality sunglasses to a friend, spouse or child!

No matter how you choose to celebrate National Sunglasses Day, we hope you enjoy and keep your eyes protected.

For all matters related to eye health, ​​Child & Family Eye Care in The Woodlands is here for you. Contact our eye doctor today!

FAQ With Our Optometrist

Should kids wear sunglasses?

Yes, children of all ages should wear sunglasses whenever they’re outdoors. In fact, it’s crucial because a child’s crystalline lens within the eye is much more clear than an adult’s, letting more light through. Contact us to learn more about kids’ eye health or to schedule an eye exam.

Can sunglasses block blue light?

Sunglasses with lenses that have a yellowish tint offer the most amount of blue light protection, from the sun and other sources. If you’re interested in blocking the blue light that’s emitted from your digital devices, speak with us to determine if computer glasses are right for you.

Can Fire Melt My Contacts Onto My Eye?

A piece of “common wisdom” that seems to be making the rounds these days is that you shouldn’t wear contact lenses at bonfires, barbecues or similar settings where fire may be present. The claim is that the extreme heat from the fire can cause the contact lenses to melt or fuse onto your eye, causing irreversible, total blindness. Our The Woodlands eye doctors are here to debunk this claim, and show you that you have nothing to fear from wearing contact lenses to your latest barbecue.

Rumors About Contact Lenses and Fire

Where did this piece of “common wisdom” come from, and how do we know it’s a myth?

As far as our eye care team can tell, this rumor was started on social media sometime in 2017, with a story about a young lady who stood close to a lit charcoal grill, looking at the coals for about 2-3 minutes. She then began experiencing pain in her eyes and, upon being taken to the hospital, was told that her contact lenses were melted to her eyes and she would be permanently blind.

Contact lenses are sterilized at temperatures of up to 250 degrees Fahrenheit, and dirty contact lenses that need to be cleaned or re-sterilized are often placed in boiling water.

Contact lenses can withstand boiling water without being destroyed. This means that the heat from the fire would have to boil away the tears in a person’s eyes before their contact lenses would even begin to sustain damage. For this to happen, you would have to be standing in the fire itself, and by then you would also have severe burns on your skin, and melted contacts may be only part (and perhaps the least part) of your concern.

At least 125 million people wear contact lenses worldwide. If normal grills and barbecues could melt contact lenses, contact lens wearers would be unable to operate or even approach household heaters, stoves, and a variety of other common heat sources without melting their lenses. Millions of cases of melted contact lenses would be reported each year. This is simply not the case.

So, obviously, contact lenses can’t melt to your eyes and cause permanent blindness because fire or other common heating sources simply don’t get hot enough for that. But is there any kernel of truth in this concern?

A Kernel of Truth? When Your Contacts Dry Out

Though it’s impossible for your contact lenses to be melted to your eye from being close to fire or another heating element, there is a very real way that you may feel like your contacts are temporarily stuck to your eye.

Being close to heat can potentially dry your contact lenses out, causing the to feel like they are stuck to your eye when you attempt to take them out. This can also result from air conditioning blowing directly into your eyes, extended time of computers and other digital screens, being outside in overly cold or dry weather, and many more things.

If your contacts feel like this sometimes, don’t worry! A drop or two of contact lens solution will help you safely take out your contact lenses without any ill effect.

Want to learn more about contact lenses and your eye health? Contact our The Woodlands eye doctors at Child & Family Eye Care today.